The Battle Cry of Freedom: Gallipolis Journal, April 16, 1863, page 4

The Battle Cry of Freedom.

We will rally round the flag boys,
Rally once again,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom;
We will rally from the hill-side,
Rally from the plain,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom.
Chorus—
The Union forever, hurrah, boys, hurrah!
Down with the traitor, and up with the stars;
For we’ll rally round the flag boys,
Rally once again,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom.
[Repeat the Chorus.]
We are springing to the call
Of our brothers gone before,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom;
And we’ll fill the vacant ranks
With a million freemen more,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom.
Chorus—
The Union forever, &c.
We will welcome to our number
The loyal, true and brave,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom;
Although we may be poor,
We will never be a slave,
Shouting the battle cry of freedom.
Chorus—
The Union forever, &c.

The Rebels Would n’t Stand Fire: Western Reserve Chronicle, January 7, 1863, page 1

The Rebels Would n’t Stand Fire.

It is well known that the rebels made but slight resistance to the crossing of the Rappahannock by our forces, and the general impression has been that no resistance was intended. Accounts, however, concur in stating that the rebels broke and cowardly ran when pressed by the bayonets of the brave Unionists. It has been stated, too, that there were but a few rebel sharpshooters stationed in the city. How true this statement is, is ascertained from an official list of the wounded published in the Richmond Enquirer, in which it is stated that there were forty-two regiments stationed in Fredericksburg to resist the crossing of the Union forces. But of them all the only ones which stood with a creditable show of bravery were from Mississippi, and known as Barksdale’s brigade.